How to Get a Tattoo and Stop the Pain. Tattoo Numbing Cream and Dr Numb

Updated on August 22, 2015
Palm tattoo of fly
Palm tattoo of fly | Source

Tattoos are experiencing a revival in popularity, the reality is that they damn well hurt! Anyone who claims that they didn't feel a thing and fell asleep on the table is telling porky pies. Tattoo's will hurt to varying degree's depending on certain external factors such as; body placement, type of tattoo and outline versus colour.

An option to relieve some of the pain is to use a numbing cream. A very well known and effective brand is Dr Numb, although there are other products available.

Numbing cream comes in two forms: cream to apply before your tattoo session and a gel or spray, for after the skin has been broken. Dr Numb is for before you commence the actual tattooing and the skin is still intact. Whereas the other form requires the skin to be open to penetrate the epidermis.

Sometimes a bit of numbing cream could be the difference between finishing your tattoo and having to come back again for a second or third session. If you know your tattoo will go over a particularly sensitive area such as the elbow, you could just use the numbing cream for that particular area only. What ever you do, you should always use numbing cream wisely as there are consequences for incorrect use.

Skull tattoo with flowers on forearm
Skull tattoo with flowers on forearm

How to Use Numbing Cream and Dr Numb

As Dr Numb and other topical numbing creams dull nerve endings, it's important to use the product correctly to avoid any long term effects and to make sure it numbs your skin.

Applying your numbing cream:

  1. Wash the area of skin you're going to have tattooed with soap and water and let it dry.
  2. Using a good portion in your hand (ALWAYS WEAR GLOVES), rub cream into the area that's to be worked on.
  3. Wearing gloves, apply a generous layer over the skin your tattoo artist will be working on. It should look like it's approximately 1mm thick all over.
  4. Cover the cream with either cling wrap, cling film or a cheesecloth-like material. You should have it covered for around 45 minutes to 1 hour before you begin your tattoo. IMPORTANT: Do not leave numbing creams on longer than one hour.
  5. The Tattoo Artist (wearing gloves or they'll end up with numb hands), will wipe off the numbing cream with a damp cloth before applying the stencil.

Dr Numb and various other numbing products, are to be used prior to the tattoo Artist breaking the skin with the needles inserted into the tattoo machine. There are other products specifically designed to be used during the process of getting a tattoo.

What Does it Feel Like After Using a Numbing Cream?

  • Once the numbing cream is active and the tattoo artist begins tattooing, you should feel minimal to nil pain for the first 45 minutes to an hour.
  • The numbing effect with gradually reduce over the next hour or two.
  • Think wisely where you use the cream, where it will be most effective especially if you have a larger design. For example, if you have work to do on your elbows, under the arms, knee's, than that might be the best place to begin tattooing first while experiencing the maximum effect of the numbing agent.

Black and white tattoo
Black and white tattoo | Source

Numbing Cream FAQs

For how long does the cream work?

Once you begin your tattoo and have correctly applied the numbing cream, you experience little if any pain for the first 45 minutes to an hour. After that, you will gradually begin to feel the tattoo machine as it works on your skin. You should be warned that some people say experiencing the return of sensation causes the pain to feel more intense than if they'd not used numbing cream at all.

Will my skin stay numb for longer if I leave the cream on for a longer time?

Leaving the cream on for longer periods of time has no effect and will not increase the feeling of numbness. In fact, it can actually have the opposite effect and cause your nerves to get all "jacked up" (in the words of my tattoo artist), making you even more uncomfortable as the tattoo proceeds.

It can also impact your healing since the numbed area will be more sensitive, and it could possibly affect blood flow to the area.

What does my tattoo artist need to know?

You should advise your artist of your intention to use a numbing cream and inform them of the name of the product. They may have their own product they prefer to use (at a cost). If they do, you should probably use that product since the artist will be more familiar with how it works and what to expect. As a result, you have a better chance of getting an awesome tattoo.

An artist may also decline to tattoo you if you use a numbing cream. This is why it's important for them to know what brand you intend to use. If it is water-based, it shouldn't be slippery for them while they do your design and they might more inclined to let you use a cream.

Do I need to wear gloves when I put on the cream?

Yes. Remember to always wear gloves when applying or touching the numbing cream as it will numb your fingers. Make sure your artist is also wearing gloves because a tattoo artist with numb fingers is NOT GOOD!

Does it make a difference if the cream is water- or glycerin-based?

It's important to use a water-based numbing cream as opposed to a glycerin-based cream so your skin won't be slippery while the artist tattoos it. A commonly known cream called Emla is not ideal for tattooing since it is glycerin-based and will make your skin slippery.


What is In a Topical Numbing Cream That Makes You Numb?

Dr Numb and other Tattoo numbing creams are generally known as topical anesthetic creams. They have commonly been used in Doctor and Dental Surgeries to assist with pain relief, when giving needles and doing minor procedures. The main ingredient in Dr Numb and most numbing creams is Lidocaine, 5% it is the highest percentage approved by medical authorities.

Another common ingredient is Prilocaine, this occurs at 6-8%.

It is also important to use a water based numbing cream as apposed to a glycerin based cream, as it is not slippery for the Artist on your skin. Some Artist may refuse to allow you to use numbing cream mainly for this reason, let them know what you're using. A commonly known cream Emla numbing cream, is not ideal for tattooing, as it is glycerin based and therefore cause the skin to be slippery during the tattoo session.

Video: One Man, a Large Back Tattoo, and His Numbing Cream

Have you ever successfully used a topical numbing cream when getting a tattoo?

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Questions & Answers

    © 2013 Anne

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      • profile image

        Kitten 3 months ago

        Hey. Thanks for the article. Just a question though...I have been told to look into pain killers (tablets) and was wondering if that would be a smart idea if I am using a gel?

        I am wanting to get a stitch (lilo and stitch) colour tattoo on my foot

      • Sunayani12 profile image

        Sunayani Mukherjee 3 years ago from Kolkata, India

        Going to have a tattoo soon. However, its just gonna be a small one. Should I still use numbing cream?

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